Non-standard Construction Insurance

Call us on
0208 256 4908
Make an enquiry

Finding insurance for a home that’s unusual, unique or quirky can be difficult. Insurers’ definition of ‘standard’ can vary greatly and often there isn’t the tick box that perfectly reflects your home. It may seem like a small issue at the time, but at the point of a claim it could become the difference between your claim being paid, and not.

At Aston Lark, we have many years of experience in helping our clients find the right home insurance for their property.

A non-standard home is one built from materials that don’t conform to the standard brick or stone walls with a slate or tile roof. Historically, non-standard construction homes are common in areas where the materials made to build them are readily available. It’s also commonplace for modern homes to be non-standard as homebuilders look to build something a little different.

The following are generally considered to be of non-standard construction:

  • Flat roofs
  • Thatched homes
  • Zinc roofs, copper roofs, green roofs, fibreglass, shingle
  • Cobb, bungaroosh, wattle and daub walls
  • Modular or prefabricated homes
  • Timber-framed or timber-clad properties
  • Homes built from Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs)
  • Concrete houses
  • Eco-homes and Passivehaus or zero-energy building (ZEB) homes
  • Huf Haus
  • Environmentally friendly additions to the home such as solar panel arrays, wind turbines, ground and air source heat pumps
  • Non-standard outbuildings including garden offices, garden studios and log cabins.

Aston Lark offers straightforward advice and competitive quotes to suit your home and personal circumstances. If your home insurance is non-standard for other reasons, we can also help.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is my home classed as being of non-standard construction?

Standard construction is normally defined as a house being built of brick or stone with a tiled roof.

So, any property that doesn’t fit this, would be seen as “non-standard”. However, homes that have a timber framed structure, including those where the frame is not visible, are also deemed non-standard by insurers.

Read more

Are all new homes classified as standard construction?

The definition varies from insurer to insurer.

The most common mistake is for homeowners to forget that part of their property has a flat roof. Either above the garage, porch, a dormer window or extension. Let your insurer know, so that they can note it. Plus, many new properties are built with a timber frame on structurally insulated panels – which may be classified a ‘non-standard’.

Read more

Related Content

Aston Lark….For the exceptional