The new UK speeding fines explained

The new UK speeding fines explained

Following on from the recent increase to fines for incorrectly using a mobile phone whilst driving, to protect the public and to reflect the seriousness of how courts view speeding, fines for serious speeding offences are set to rise significantly. This will take effect on 24th April.

Currently, the minimum penalty is £100 fine and 3 points. Going forward fines will be banded into 3 categories.

So what will this mean to me if I am caught speeding?

Band C 

A Band C speeding fine means that if you are caught speeding (for example) at 51mph or above in a 30mph limit you will face a fine up to the equivalent of 150% of your weekly income and 6 penalty points on your driving licence, or disqualification from driving for up to 56 days. If you are disqualified for 56 days or more you must apply for a new licence before you are able to start driving again.

Band B 

You might receive a Band B speeding fine for doing between 41-50mph, this would mean a fine equivalent to 100% of your weekly income, and 4-6 penalty points on your driving licence, or disqualification from driving for up to 28 days.

Band A

A Band A speeding fine would be appropriate if you are caught speeding between 31-40 in a 30mph zone, and you can expect to receive a fine equivalent to 50% of your weekly income and 3 penalty points on your driving licence.

Are the fines unlimited?

No, the fines are capped at £2,500 for speeding on a motorway and £1,000 everywhere else.

Disqualification from driving vs. penalty points

If you are caught speeding in Band B or C, magistrates may consider your speeding too serious for penalty points and disqualify you instead.

You might wonder if you're better off being disqualified from driving for a short time, rather than taking the 6 penalty points on your licence - especially if you've already racked up a handful of points with previous motoring offences.

You could be right, especially if the addition of 6 penalty points would take you over the 12 point limit, as this would attract a six month driving ban rather than up to 56 days. 

However, please be aware that magistrates know about this potential 'loophole', so odds are that they would be reluctant to ban you for a short time in lieu of penalty points, especially if you have been consistently driving at dangerously high speeds. 

Conclusion

These new bands are a minimum guideline only, a magistrate can still decide to fine or ban you from driving above these limits.

A disqualification from driving is something you must tell us and your insurer about and will have an adverse affect on your premium.

At the end of the day, we all live fast paced lives and drive cars designed to go quick, but stop and ask yourself, why do I have to get from A to B quickly? Leave yourself extra time to get to a meeting.

After all, speeding restrictions are put into place for everyone’s safety.  

For further clarification or more information, please feel free to get in touch with me on 01252 359060 or suzi.rackley@larkinsurance.co.uk