7th February 2020

Is my home classed as being of non-standard construction?

By Steve Moores, Dip CII
Account Executive
Tudor house - non-standard construction

Standard construction is normally defined as a house being built of brick or stone with a tiled roof.

So, any property that doesn’t fit this, would be seen as “non-standard”. However, homes that have a timber framed structure, including those where the frame is not visible, are also deemed non-standard by insurers.

This includes new build houses which have a structural timber frame, behind the brickwork. Such houses may be a greater fire risk and the rebuild of a water- or fire-damaged property with a timber frame can be more complicated than an equivalent home built entirely of brick and block. As a result, a non-standard, new, timber framed property may cost more to insure.

Older, timber framed houses, often with brick or plaster infill, are usually noted as non-standard.

Older properties in general, are often non-standard. Lead roofs, thatched roofs, plaster infill, pargeting, old water mills, metal barns, even steel framed extensions are all quite common.

Homes built of concrete, Structurally Insulated Panels (SIPs) or pre-fabricated off site are also deemed non-standard. These are often quick to build as there is less labour time on site, but much harder to repair. Hence, they can be more expensive to insure.

Flat roofs, whether asphalt, rubber bond or other type are also categorised as non-standard.

If your home is non-standard, and you have not declared this to your insurer, the insurer may reduce the amount of a claim paid out, or even decline to pay a claim completely.  If you are struggling to find a quote for your non-standard home, or if you’re unsure of the construction type of your home, call Aston Lark. We don’t have any call centres and you’ll speak to an expert who will look after you and tailor a quote to suit your property.

There’s nothing standard about your home and there’s nothing standard about our service. Call 0208 712 8076 to find out more.